Post-Master’s Certificate

100% Online Certificate

Post-Master’s Certificate (PMC)

UNE Online’s Post-Master’s Certificate (PMC) is designed for educators with a master’s degree who are looking to advance their teaching abilities further and make research-informed decisions about their pedagogical practices.  

UNE Online’s PMC offers a wide variety of courses covering critical educational and leadership topics at the postgraduate level, giving students options and flexibility. Our 15-credit program is 100% online and can be completed in less than a year, making it convenient for working professionals. 

This certificate has focus areas in Curriculum and Instructional Strategy, Literacy K-12, Inclusion Education, and Educational Leadership. Students may choose to design their own certificate, choosing courses best aligned with their interests and aspirations. 

Students who complete UNE Online’s Post-Master’s Certificate will be able to:

  • Apply research to leadership decisions. 
  • Articulate the requirements of the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL). 
  • Demonstrate a high degree of specialized knowledge and skills in school administration. 
  • Exhibit leadership skills in real-life school administrative settings. 

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Current Application Deadline

April 15, 2024

Summer A Session

Courses begin May 8, 2024

Time Left to Apply:

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Why Choose the University of New England Online?

Fully Online

Fully Online

Courses are delivered entirely online, allowing you the flexibility to complete coursework around your schedule.

Affordable

Affordable

UNE Online offers some of the most affordable and competitive tuition rates, allowing you to complete your program for less.

No GRE Required

No GRE Required

Applicants do not need to submit GRE scores to be considered and accepted into UNE Online’s Post-Master’s Certificate Program.

Accredited

Accredited

We are regionally accredited by New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE).

 

MSEd Focus Areas

UNE Online’s Post-Master’s Certificate offers 4 pre-bundled focus areas* to choose from, or students can choose their 5 courses, for 100% customization of the certificate. Our courses are designed using high-quality, innovative curricula that can be immediately implemented into the student’s pedagogical practices. 

Upon completion of the Post-Master’s Certificate program, students receive a diploma stating “Post-Master’s Certificate.” Please note that although none of the Post-Master’s Certificates lead to certification on their own, many contain state-approved courses. Speak with your enrollment counselor to learn more.

*Please note – the focus areas do not show on transcripts or diplomas.

Focus Area TitleFocus Area Description
Curriculum & Instructional Strategy

Develop and learn curricular solutions while strengthening your classroom practices of incorporating literacy, inclusion, and educational leadership skills.  

Curriculum & Instruction Course List

Literacy K-12

Take a deep dive into the importance of reading and writing to all students’ success.  

Literacy K-12 Course List

Special Education

Study critical theory and improve your professional practice based on the most recent special education instructional techniques research. 

Special Education Course List

Educational Leadership

Understand the theories and practices of effective leadership, centering on the importance of team building, decision-making, problem-solving, and strategic planning. 

Educational Leadership Course List

Individualized

Choosing an individualized course plan gives you the opportunity to build a curriculum that is tailor-made to your unique career ambitions and professional goals. Select 5 elective courses across all available topic areas to custom-build your PMC.

PMC Course List

The UNE Online Experience

“I am back at UNE Online and in the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) program because I didn’t want to get another master’s degree, but I do want to become a Literacy Specialist. Earning this CAGS will allow me to sit for the test to become a Literacy Specialist.”

Ally Loukas, MSEd ‘20, CAGS Student

Admissions

At UNE Online, our goal is to admit students who demonstrate an ability to be successful in the PMC program and who will continue that success in their future endeavors. We take a holistic approach when reviewing applications. While there is no typical background for successful applicants, students are often characterized by a lifelong curiosity and an inclination to take on new challenges.  

Admission Requirements:

  • Master’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • Applications are reviewed holistically as a determination of academic readiness. The admissions committee values previous academic performance as indicated on transcripts and considers it as part of the review process.
  • *No GRE required

Create an Online Portal Account to begin your application. To complete your online application, you will need to provide the following:

  • Current Resume/CV
  • Please provide a goal statement describing your motivation for graduate study at the University of New England (min 250 words) OR upload a professional or academic writing sample from the past five years.
  • Official transcripts
  • Apply now for free!

    APPLY NOW

    PMC Curriculum

    Instructional leaders must ensure that the teaching and learning taking place in a school is rigorous, relevant, and designed to meet the needs of all students. Participants will explore current models and trends in curriculum design and instructional practices with a focus on using research and data to guide decision-making about content and pedagogy. This course will also look at the role an instructional leader plays in serving as a change agent to promote best practices in a school.

    This course introduces learners to the use of technology in the inclusive education of individuals with disabilities. Methods and techniques for evaluation and determination of appropriate uses of assistive technology are addressed. A range of assistive and inclusive technologies are covered as well as teaching strategies that support the implementation of technologies. Using technology in universally designed educational environments is examined. Participants will be expected to have access to and use selected teaching and learning technologies with learners with disabilities in inclusive settings.

    This course provides the time and resources to delve deeply into strategies for teaching students in the inclusion classroom. Participants will evaluate strategies to determine the best practices available to meet their professional needs. Students will collate their new learning into a user-friendly tool tailored to their own teaching circumstances. Rarely do educators have the opportunity for such sustained exploration of meaningful research-based strategies that can have a direct impact on differentiated teaching and learning.

    This course focuses on research-based study skills and strategies for providing literacy instruction within the classroom content area. Educators will learn to integrate literacy and study skills instruction in their classrooms while designing reading assignments that afford students access to the concepts in the text. Concepts and strategies presented are relevant to the needs of ESL students.

    The reading-writing connection will be the focus of the course. Educators will have the opportunity to explore this connection through the examination and application of successful instructional strategies and activities. Educators, regardless of the level or content they teach, will be provided with tools that will help to maintain learners’ literacy development as they read and write to learn, or learn to read and write.

     

    This course will address the foundational knowledge that teachers of literacy need in order to understand the reading and writing process for students. In this course, teachers will be exposed to major theories, research, and best practices in the literacy field. Teachers will be asked to draw upon this theoretical and practice knowledge to think about issues of practice. Through engaging inquiry units, teachers will become active participants in developing a strong foundational base for literacy instruction for all learners in their classrooms.

    This course focuses on the use of assessments to determine a learner’s reading and/or writing skills. Students in this course will examine, create, evaluate, and reflect on a variety of literacy assessments as they are directly connected to data-driven instruction and literacy achievement. Each course module will engage students in a range of literacy assessments and how to use resulting data to inform instruction of subject area content as well as develop and deepen literacy skills. Course participants will be engaged in the research around assessment types as well as how to modify assessments and instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.

    This course focuses on research-based study skills and strategies for providing literacy instruction within the classroom content area. Educators will learn to integrate literacy and study skills instruction in their classrooms while designing reading assignments that afford students access to the concepts in the text. Concepts and strategies presented are relevant to the needs of ESL students.

    The reading-writing connection will be the focus of the course. Educators will have the opportunity to explore this connection through the examination and application of successful instructional strategies and activities. Educators, regardless of the level or content they teach, will be provided with tools that will help to maintain learners’ literacy development as they read and write to learn, or learn to read and write.

    This course will address how to engage in differentiated literacy practices to meet the needs of diverse learners. Educators will be immersed in the foundational knowledge that will aid them in creating effective instruction that will assist students who need support in their literacy development. The readings and coursework will explore how to approach literacy challenges from the classroom and school levels in a systematic way as well as incorporating a culturally responsive approach to pedagogy.

     

    Federal and state laws, regulations, and judicial decisions relating to the education of students with special needs in inclusion classrooms are analyzed. Key legal provisions, such as free appropriate public education, least restrictive environment, and due process are examined. Methods of conflict resolution and mediation as well as ethical standards are examined. Students are required to apply what they learn as they research and analyze case scenarios.

    This course introduces learners to the use of technology in the inclusive education of individuals with disabilities. Methods and techniques for evaluation and determination of appropriate uses of assistive technology are addressed. A range of assistive and inclusive technologies are covered as well as teaching strategies that support the implementation of technologies. Using technology in universally designed educational environments is examined. Participants will be expected to have access to and use selected teaching and learning technologies with learners with disabilities in inclusive settings.

    This course focuses on assessment approaches for identifying students with disabilities and assessing progress toward learning goals and standards. Participants examine formal assessment tools and procedures used in the diagnosis of disabilities and identification of the instructional and behavioral needs of students. Participants will explore a range of student strengths and exceptionalities as they determine best educational practices to meet the needs of all learners in the least restrictive setting.

    This course provides the time and resources to delve deeply into strategies for teaching students in the inclusion classroom. Participants will evaluate strategies to determine the best practices available to meet their professional needs. Students will collate their new learning into a user-friendly tool tailored to their own teaching circumstances. Rarely do educators have the opportunity for such sustained exploration of meaningful research-based strategies that can have a direct impact on differentiated teaching and learning.

    This course explores Universal Design for Learning (UDL). It addresses the elements of effective design for learning variability across educational settings including those found in K-12, higher education and corporate environments. Participants will explore and practice designing meaningful learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners.

     

    This course provides the overarching context for organizational leadership. Participants consider theories and practices relating to effective and ethical leadership in organizational settings. Topics include diagnosing the work environment, decision-making, problem-solving, strategic planning, and human resource development. Students will reflect on their own leadership, observe and analyze other leaders, and explore the theories and practices that relate to the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL).

    This course provides a foundation of the legal underpinnings of the American education system and explores how legal decisions have had an effect on an educational system that covers lifelong learning. Specific legal principles relating to church/state issues, tort liability, teacher responsibilities, student rights and administrative concerns such as contracts and collective bargaining are examined. Participants will analyze case studies to apply their understanding and create a compendium of the laws unique to the states in which they work.

    This course examines the requirements of educational leaders engaged in supervising and evaluating educational personnel. Emphasis is given to the theory behind the practice as well as different methods and hands-on applications. Participants explore such practices as peer evaluations, self-evaluations, portfolios, and mentoring. 

    This course traces the historical background and development of school finance acts and examines the intent, concepts and relationship inherent in these acts. Processes by which state subsidies are computed, allocated and distributed are considered. Budget and expenditure practices in relation to these acts are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on helping students develop a clear conceptual understanding of the overall methods by which state aid is provided to local school systems. Readings, research, and other assignments are designed to acquaint students with school finance practices in their respective states and local school districts.

    This course will include: an overview of organizational theories and systems; the inclusion of organizational theory in the educational change process; the functions, objectives, development, and assessment of strategic plans; and the relationship between strategic planning and budget development.

     

    This course enhances classroom-based experiences by linking them with professional research skills.  Educators in this course will learn to locate and critically review a wide range of professional resources, articulate knowledge from a research-based framework, and collaborate with their peers on navigating school cultures. This course highlights the roles and responsibilities of leaders in a school setting.

    This course provides the overarching context for organizational leadership. Participants consider theories and practices relating to effective and ethical leadership in organizational settings. Topics include diagnosing the work environment, decision-making, problem-solving, strategic planning, and human resource development. Students will reflect on their own leadership, observe and analyze other leaders, and explore the theories and practices that relate to the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL).

    This course provides a foundation of the legal underpinnings of the American education system and explores how legal decisions have had an effect on an educational system that covers lifelong learning. Specific legal principles relating to church/state issues, tort liability, teacher responsibilities, student rights and administrative concerns such as contracts and collective bargaining are examined. Participants will analyze case studies to apply their understanding and create a compendium of the laws unique to the states in which they work.

    Regardless of how beneficial a desired change may seem, new initiatives are often difficult to implement. This course examines change theory, studies case histories of change efforts, and reviews change strategies in order to equip students with skills for introducing effective reforms.

    This course examines the requirements of educational leaders engaged in supervising and evaluating educational personnel. Emphasis is given to the theory behind the practice as well as different methods and hands-on applications. Participants explore such practices as peer evaluations, self-evaluations, portfolios, and mentoring. 

    Instructional leaders must ensure that the teaching and learning taking place in a school is rigorous, relevant, and designed to meet the needs of all students. Participants will explore current models and trends in curriculum design and instructional practices with a focus on using research and data to guide decision-making about content and pedagogy. This course will also look at the role an instructional leader plays in serving as a change agent to promote best practices in a school.

    This course traces the historical background and development of school finance acts and examines the intent, concepts and relationship inherent in these acts. Processes by which state subsidies are computed, allocated and distributed are considered. Budget and expenditure practices in relation to these acts are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on helping students develop a clear conceptual understanding of the overall methods by which state aid is provided to local school systems. Readings, research, and other assignments are designed to acquaint students with school finance practices in their respective states and local school districts.

    This course will include: an overview of organizational theories and systems; the inclusion of organizational theory in the educational change process; the functions, objectives, development, and assessment of strategic plans; and the relationship between strategic planning and budget development.

    Federal and state laws, regulations, and judicial decisions relating to the education of students with special needs in inclusion classrooms are analyzed. Key legal provisions, such as free appropriate public education, least restrictive environment, and due process are examined. Methods of conflict resolution and mediation as well as ethical standards are examined. Students are required to apply what they learn as they research and analyze case scenarios.

    This course focuses on assessment approaches for identifying students with disabilities and assessing progress toward learning goals and standards. Participants examine formal assessment tools and procedures used in the diagnosis of disabilities and identification of the instructional and behavioral needs of students. Participants will explore a range of student strengths and exceptionalities as they determine best educational practices to meet the needs of all learners in the least restrictive setting.

    This course provides the time and resources to delve deeply into strategies for teaching students in the inclusion classroom. Participants will evaluate strategies to determine the best practices available to meet their professional needs. Students will collate their new learning into a user-friendly tool tailored to their own teaching circumstances. Rarely do educators have the opportunity for such sustained exploration of meaningful research-based strategies that can have a direct impact on differentiated teaching and learning.

    This course will help participants identify and prioritize essential behavioral skills in their work with students. They will explore how to model, teach and nurture behavioral skills and analyze differentiation strategies as Tier 1 of a Positive Behavior Intervention and Support model and prepare for intervention and monitoring at Tier 2 and Tier 3. The course will engage participants in addressing factors that influence a school’s response to behavioral considerations such as available resources, parent collaboration, school, and community culture.

    This course will focus on the use of data to create inclusive environments for all students. Participants in this course will apply the components of the Continuous School Improvement Framework (Plan-Implement-Evaluate-Improve). Participants will use data readily available in their classroom, school, or district. Several protocols for analysis will be used. Themes will include using data to support a shared vision and using data to examine school core values.

    This course will deepen the participants’ understanding of the factors that affect a learner’s ability to access their education. Participants will explore the current research in neuroscience and its connection to social and emotional learning. Participants will review and understand practical strategies to address the social and emotional learning needs of all learners and develop a social and emotional learning plan including the development of self-regulation skills in all learners.

    This course explores Universal Design for Learning (UDL). It addresses the elements of effective design for learning variability across educational settings including those found in K-12, higher education and corporate environments. Participants will explore and practice designing meaningful learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners.

    This course will address the foundational knowledge that teachers of literacy need in order to understand the reading and writing process for students. In this course, teachers will be exposed to major theories, research, and best practices in the literacy field. Teachers will be asked to draw upon this theoretical and practice knowledge to think about issues of practice. Through engaging inquiry units, teachers will become active participants in developing a strong foundational base for literacy instruction for all learners in their classrooms.

    This course focuses on the use of assessments to determine a learner’s reading and/or writing skills. Students in this course will examine, create, evaluate, and reflect on a variety of literacy assessments as they are directly connected to data-driven instruction and literacy achievement. Each course module will engage students in a range of literacy assessments and how to use resulting data to inform instruction of subject area content as well as develop and deepen literacy skills. Course participants will be engaged in the research around assessment types as well as how to modify assessments and instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.

    This course focuses on research-based study skills and strategies for providing literacy instruction within the classroom content area. Educators will learn to integrate literacy and study skills instruction in their classrooms while designing reading assignments that afford students access to the concepts in the text. Concepts and strategies presented are relevant to the needs of ESL students.

    The reading-writing connection will be the focus of the course. Educators will have the opportunity to explore this connection through the examination and application of successful instructional strategies and activities. Educators, regardless of the level or content they teach, will be provided with tools that will help to maintain learners’ literacy development as they read and write to learn, or learn to read and write.

    This course will address how to engage in differentiated literacy practices to meet the needs of diverse learners. Educators will be immersed in the foundational knowledge that will aid them in creating effective instruction that will assist students who need support in their literacy development. The readings and coursework will explore how to approach literacy challenges from the classroom and school levels in a systematic way as well as incorporating a culturally responsive approach to pedagogy.

    This course will focus on the leadership skills that the professional will need as a Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach. Specifically, this course will explore the coaching relationship and how to work collaboratively to plan, implement, and supervise literacy programs at the individual, classroom, school, and district-wide level. Focus will also be on facilitating a literate environment, working with literacy in a diverse society, and developing leadership skills. This course will also fulfill the requirements that many states have for course work in Administration and Supervision of Reading and Language Arts Programs. 

    There are no prerequisites for this course.

    This course will focus specifically on meeting the needs of students whose native language is not English. Topics will include sociocultural factors, second language acquisition and development, emergent and experienced reading and writing development for English learners, multiple test sources, text analysis, process writing, conversational, academic, and content language considerations, assessment types and techniques, language arts resources, and effective instructional strategies and models. This course will help prepare future Reading Specialists to work with this growing population and to support teachers who have students from different linguistic backgrounds.

    This course is designed to straddle the disciplines of regular and special education. Students will explore the implementation of multi-tier approaches to the early identification and support of students with learning and behavior needs and ways to differentiate instruction. The course attends to the collaboration that takes places between regular and special education teachers when assessing and planning instruction for all students in an inclusive setting.

    In conjunction with EDU 750, this course is the first of two practicum courses that closely examine a wide range of assessment and instructional methods to support literacy development of struggling learners. Students in this course work closely with an onsite mentor, a learning community of students and a UNE instructor. This collaboration will support students as they develop relationships with K-12 students who struggle in literacy. Experiences in the course include working in a one-on-one tutorial setting, administering a variety of reading diagnostic assessments, and collaboratively creating and implementing literacy programming that builds on diagnosis with the goal of moving learners forward in their literacy growth. This course meets most states’ requirements that a 6 credit practicum be part of an approved graduate program. Before registration can be made available for this course, students must complete all of the required internship paperwork.

    In conjunction with EDU 749, this course is the second of two practicum courses that closely examine a wide range of assessment and instructional methods to support literacy development of struggling learners. Students in this course work closely with an onsite mentor, a learning community of students and a UNE instructor. This collaboration will support students as they develop relationships with K-12 students who struggle in literacy. Experiences in the course include working in a one-on-one tutorial setting, administering a variety of reading diagnostic assessments, and collaboratively creating and implementing literacy programming that builds on diagnosis with the goal of moving learners forward in their literacy growth. This course meets most states’ requirements that a 6 credit practicum be part of an approved graduate program.

    Before registration can be made available for this course, students must complete all of the required internship paperwork. Please contact your student support specialist for details.

     

    Interprofessional Electives

    Post-Master’s Certificate students also have the option to take electives from our other online graduate programs. A full list of these interprofessional courses can be found here: Shared Interprofessional Course List

    Stackability

    UNE Online now offers students the opportunity to transfer up to four 3-credit courses from our PMC – or other previous post-master’s coursework (taken within the last five years) – to our Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree. Students who transfer four 3-credit courses into the program have the potential to graduate in just over two years. Read more about the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.).

    Tuition and Fees

    Tuition for the University of New England Online’s Post Master’s Certificate is competitive among other schools at $660/credit,* and because all of our courses are delivered 100% online, you will not incur the cost of traveling or relocating to complete your degree. (*Note: Tuition is subject to change. Listed tuition does not include the cost of fees, books, or additional credits that may be required, etc. Contact student Financial Services to learn more.)

    Cost per
    Credit: $660

    # of credits: 15

    Typical cost:
    $9,900

     

    General Services Fee (per semester, non-refundable for matriculated students)
    $80
    Tuition (per credit hour)
    $660
    Technology Fee (per semester)
    $160
    Registration Fee (non-matriculated students per semester)
    $30

    Accreditation

    When choosing an institution of higher education, you want to be sure your investment will hold value upon completion. We are proud to hold NECHE (New England Commission on Higher Education) accreditation at the University of New England and for our graduate programs. NECHE Accreditation ensures a high level of academic quality and public accountability for the education being provided.

    Faculty

    The University of New England Online’s MSEd faculty and staff are top-notch. They are a team of dedicated professionals and are active and respected in their field. Many members of our team have appointments in other University of New England Colleges and are affiliated with various reputable institutions of education. Meet the Education Faculty and Staff

     

    Student Support & Resources

    At the University of New England Online, we are committed to providing our students with the highest level of academic and personal support. We understand the unique challenge of adult students who are often juggling school, career and family, which is why we offer a robust Student Academic Success Center (SASC) and high-touch academic advising. Learn more about Student Support and Resources.  

    FAQ

    Accreditation

    Yes. The University of New England is regionally accredited by the New England Commission on Higher Education (NECHE), which accredits schools and colleges in the six New England states. Accreditation by the Commission indicates that the institution has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators.

    Regional accreditation is the primary type of institutional accreditation recognized in the United States. Some institutions with online programs hold national accreditation because they are unwilling or unable to meet the rigorous standards of regional accreditation. You should also know that many educational institutions holding regional accreditation do not recognize credits or degrees earned at institutions that are nationally accredited. This is very important if you plan on transferring from one college or university to another part way through a degree program, or if you plan to pursue additional degrees at different colleges or universities.

    CAGS AEL is approved for certification in the State of Maine:

    • CAGS AEL is approved for Building Administrator certification (040)

    Your state may offer reciprocity for this certification. None of our online graduate programs are approved for initial teacher certification.

     

    Coursework

    You can complete your studies at your convenience in the comfort of your own home. No campus visits are required. You will have access to your coursework 24 hours a day, which can be completed around your busy schedule.

    No. All of our courses are asynchronous – you choose when to log in and complete your coursework (while adhering to all posted deadlines and due dates, of course). In the event there is a live session, the instructor will make the video available for viewing at any time.

    On average, most students spend 15-20 hours per week studying to ensure completion of one 3-credit course per eight-week term. However, this can vary greatly depending on your personal and professional circumstances.

    Historically we have found that students have the most success by starting out with one course per eight-week term. However, if you can show that you are able to complete the coursework competently, you may contact your student support specialist to explore enrolling in more than one course per term.

    At UNE Online, a focus area is a suggested bundle of electives in a specific area of interest.

    You can choose your electives from our suggested groupings in four optional focus areas (curriculum & instructional strategy, literacy K-12, inclusion education, and educational leadership), or you can customize your degree by selecting a combination of electives that best serves your professional interests. Even if you choose an optional focus area, you are not forced to take all of the courses in that focus area; for instance, you could take four online learning courses, and one literacy course. We also allow our students to take electives from our other online graduate programs: you can find these on the Shared Interprofessional Course List page. This flexible offering allows you to customize your course plan based on your specific career goals.

    While this bundle of electives will be listed on your transcript and the focus area can be emphasized on a personal resume, please note that the focus area title will not appear on your transcript or diploma.

     

    PMC

    Yes, our PMC students or any PMC student from a regionally accredited institution are welcome to transfer up to four 3-credit courses (maximum of twelve credits) into our Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program.

    Transfer courses must:

    • Be classified as post-master’s level.
    • Be worth 3 credits.
    • Have been taken within five years of application.
    • Have been completed with a grade of “B” or better.
    • Be equivalent to one of the required program courses or an elective course that meets the goals of the student’s education.

    Transfer credit is not accepted for the Post-Master’s Certificate at this time.

    The 15-credit Post-Master’s Certificate can be completed in less than one year. Get in touch with an enrollment counselor to find out the particulars of your program.

     

    Admissions

    An enrollment counselor is prepared to answer all of your questions and walk you through the steps necessary to apply to this program. Complete an information request to have an enrollment counselor contact you.

    Course tuition for our programs can be found on the tuition costs section. The University of New England’s online Graduate Programs in Education offer online students the same outstanding education that campus-based students receive. Easy access to affordable education helps us fulfill our goal of ensuring that every individual who has the desire to further their education has the opportunity to do so.

    If you graduated more than a year ago, you will need to reapply. Due to privacy policies, UNE does not keep personal student records for more than a year. However, if you graduated within a year, all you’ll need to do is fill out a continuing education application. Contact an enrollment counselor to get started.